Categorized | Opinion

How to argue and win (Part Three)

By David Peel
Logical thinking is rare. It is not often taught in schools.  I have taught logic, coached debate, and try to use logic in my injury law practice.  (The first two articles in this series can be found on my blog at PeelLawFirm.com).
“Fallacies” are errors in logical reasoning.
When a person’s argument is just repeating what they already assumed (which may be true or not) beforehand, this called a “circular argument” or “circular reasoning.”
It is very important to remember that an argument may be true, an argument may be inherently logically logical, but yet still untrue, even if made illogically.
“The Bible is true, because the Bible says it’s true.”
“The fossils are 65 million-years-old, because they were found in a 65 million-year-old layer, because it has 65 million-year-old fossils in it.”
In the first one, the assumption is that the Bible speaks only truth, and it must be truthful that it is true. The second one assumes dating of the very thing used to date.
If the premises in the argument is basically the same as the conclusion, it is often a circular argument. In summary, they start where they finish, and finish where they started.
The more you listen to the arguments presented, you will be better able to spot fallacies.
Peel seeks justice for those injured in car accidents, medical malpractice, and nursing homes. He often addresses churches, clubs and groups without charge. Peel may be reached through PeelLawFirm.com wherein other articles may be accessed.

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